The Beazley Archive

The Beazley Archive is a research unit of Oxford University's Faculty of the Classics, and specializes in the art of ancient Greece and Rome. Users can find art, pottery, gems, sculpture, and photographs. Each of these topics has a different database, and in addition, users can search a 'merged database.' Most of the images I have seen are black and white, but are a decent size. The images are available for non-commercial use.

Maecenas: Images of Ancient Greece and Rome


Perseus Digital Library

Since its inception in 1985, the Perseus Digital Library has been exploring the world of digital libraries. Its flagship collection, under development since 1987, covers the history, literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. In addition to extensive research articles, the digital library features digital images under the "art and archeology" section and the "exhibits" section. Some materials within the library have different levels of copyright restrictions, and thus some materials may be restricted. However, most materials are "provided for the personal use of students, scholars, and the public. "

Trajan's Column

According to the author of the site, "This is a site for exploring the Column of Trajan as a sculptural monument. The core of the site is a searchable database of over 500 images focusing on various aspects of the design and execution of the column's sculptural decoration. These images (slides and drawings) were generated by and for sculptor Peter Rockwell, over the course of his study of Roman stone-carving practices. The aim of this site is to make these images available to the widest possible public, in a form that can contribute both to ongoing study by specialists and to enjoyment and appreciation of the monument by the general public." The images are decent quality and are available in medium and high resolutions, accompanied by detailed metadata.

The Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae

"The Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae is a collection of engravings of Rome and Roman antiquities, the core of which consists of prints published by Antonio Lafreri and gathered under a title page he printed in the mid-1570's." The images are both searchable and browsable, and are accompanied by detailed metadata. In addition, users can view a zoomable image. This site is essential for anyone studying the Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae. All images may be used for scholarly purposes.